Lindsay Heger

Lindsay Heger Researcher
Lindsay Heger
Expertise: Civil War and Conflict, International Security, Non-State Actors & Governance, Terrorism, Trends in Peace and Conflict

Lindsay Heger is a political scientist and holds a PhD from the University of California, San Diego. Prior to arriving at OEF, Lindsay was a post-doctoral researcher at the Institute for Global Cooperation and Conflict through the University of California and a lecturer at the Korbel School for International Studies at the University of Denver. Her research, straddling themes in comparative politics and international security, focuses largely on why rebel groups choose different types of violent methods and how post-conflict states consolidate peace through good governance. Lindsay has conducted extensive field work on the Irish Republican Army and post-conflict stability in Northern Ireland. Her work has appeared in various journals including International Studies Quarterly, Conflict and Cooperation, and Terrorism and Political Violence. She also contributes to political blogs. In her spare time, Lindsay enjoys running, the mountains, and good food.

Latest News


Publications

Somali Investment Survey Report

Somali Diaspora Investment Survey Report

Written by Lindsay Heger, Jay Benson, Lee C. Sorensen, Alexandria E. Wise on June 16, 2016

As the Somali regions continue to emerge from decades of civil war, investment is expanding, banks are opening their doors, and Somali exports are increasingly finding markets.

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Rebels and Service Provision

Negotiating With Rebels: The Effect of Rebel Service Provision on Conflict Negotiations

Written by Lindsay Heger, Danielle F. Jung on September 29, 2015

When rebels provide social services, do they have more leverage negotiating the terms of a peace deal? The literature suggests service-providing groups may, on average, have a wider base of support and a more centralized organizational structure.

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L. Heger in Journal of Peace Research

Votes and violence: Pursuing terrorism while navigating politics

Written by Lindsay Heger on December 5, 2014

Many of the world’s most infamous terrorist organizations demonstrate clear political aptitude, maintaining highly successful political parties while simultaneously carrying out terrorist attacks.

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A Gap Exists in Research and Implementation

A Gap Exists! (But it is Smaller and More Specific Than You Think)

Written by Lindsay Heger, Chris Cyr on November 7, 2014

In recent decades, many who are involved in international relations and foreign policy have bemoaned the increasing divide between what practitioners do and the issues scholars research.

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Common Framework NGOs Report

A Common Framework for Understanding Non-state Organizations

Written by Lindsay Heger, Danielle Jung, Sarah Stroup, Wendy Wong on May 1, 2014

This paper serves as an introduction to conceptualizations of non-state organizations (NSOs) and, in particular, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), multinational corporations
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New Power Politics

The New Power Politics: Networks and Transnational Security Governance

Written by Lindsay Heger, Deborah Avant on February 12, 2014

The workshop series “The New Power Politics: Networks, Governance, and Global Security” examined how various networks of state and non-state actors work to address the governance of security.

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Criminal Court and Torture

Does the International Criminal Court Deter Torture?

Written by Lindsay Heger, Eamon Aloyo, Yvonne M. Dutton on March 8, 2013

Despite widespread commitment to the international human rights regime, human rights abuses persist and go unpunished.

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Terrorism and Political Violence

Organizing for Resistance: How Group Structure Impacts the Character of Violence

Written by Lindsay Heger, Danielle Jung, Wendy H. Wong on November 15, 2012

How does the way in which a group organizes change the lethality of the group's attacks? In this article, we argue that groups organized vertically as hierarchies are likely to conduct more lethal attacks.

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