Global Governance Discussion Series

Convening at United Nations headquarters in New York and Geneva, OEFR, in partnership with the Academic Council on the United Nations (ACUNS) and Friedrich Ebert Stiftung–NY, provides a forum for scholars and policy makers to share information and forge new partnerships. These 90-minute lunchtime discussions explore the scholarship relevant to the peace and security community. This exchange of insights supports both effective policymaking and well-grounded scholarship.

Preventing Mass Atrocity Crimes: Is There a Responsibility Not to Veto?

Do the permanent five members of the UN Security Council have a responsibility to forego their veto power in situations where decisive Council action could prevent mass atrocity crimes?

Global and Regional Nuclear Orders in a Moment of Geopolitical Uncertainty

This discussion was an exchange of ideas among those who embrace the upcoming negotiations as a global effort to delegitimize nuclear weapons and others who see such talks as a distraction from the Treaty on the Non-P
Women Peace and Security

Women, Peace, and Security: Are We There Yet?

Participants discussed how to link women, peace, and security to other global agendas and initiatives, particularly the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its goal and targets on gender equality and the susta
World Economic Forum

The UN Secretary-General We Deserve: Towards an Open and Transparent Selection (Geneva)

For the first time in the history of the United Nations, candidates for Secretary-General are running publicly for election.
Un Secretary General

The Secretary-General We Deserve: Towards an Open and Transparent Selection (New York)

Since the UN’s inception, the permanent five members of the Security Council (China, France, Russian, the United Kingdom and the United States) have chosen the candidate in secrecy and, without exception.
Local Ownership and UN Peacebuilding

Local Ownership and UN Peacebuilding: Discourse vs Operationalization

In principle, the UN is committed to local ownership in its peace operations in post-conflict states.
U.S. Air Force photo/Osakabe Yasuo

Can Elected Members Make a Difference in the UN Security Council? Australia’s Experience in 2013-2014 (Geneva)

The UN Charter gives the Security Council the extraordinary function of being responsible for international peace and security.
Petty Officer 2nd Class Taylor Mohr, Department of Defense

Can Elected Members Make a Difference in the UN Security Council? Australia’s Experience in 2013-2014 (New York)

The UN Charter gives the Security Council the extraordinary function of being responsible for international peace and security.
Development Ends Poverty

Development as End of Poverty: Reform or Reinvention?

This event explored why poverty reduction is the ultimate goal of development. Elham Sayedsayamdost asked, “Why do we focus on poverty as opposed to other problems such as inequality?
Assessing the UN Security Council

Assessing the UN Security Council: A Concert Perspective

An alternative approach to assessing Security Council effectiveness presents itself if the body is thought of less as an instrument for providing global security and more as a grouping of the major powers.
Russian Presidential Press and Information Office

Rebalancing the G-20 from Efficiency to Legitimacy: The 3G Coalition and the Practice of Global Governance

This event looked at the role of small states in global governance institutions. The speakers began by explaining a shift in world politics toward more informality,.