Block Chain Helping Governments in Fragile States
Business & Governance, Good Governance

Is Blockchain an Answer to Enterprise Development in Fragile States?

Author(s): Victor Odundo Owuor, Dianna E. Almanza
Date: December 20, 2019
Publication Type: Fact Sheets
Research Topics: Business & Governance, Good Governance

Overview:

In an increasingly networked and digital world in which millions of transactions are recorded daily, the potential of data tampering in centralized ledgers that are the primary depository of these records can not be overemphasized. To partially confront this challenge, distributed ledger technologies such as blockchain are growing in global use. This fact sheet builds on this narrative and suggests ways in which block chain can be particularly useful to enterprises in fragile and conflict-affected states.

Key Findings:

The fact sheet illustrates - through tangible examples - how blockchain can help fragile and conflict-affected states overcome their lack of 20th century legacy systems and leapfrog into the 21st century. These examples are in the following areas:

  • Financial inclusion
  • Business development services
  • Wildlife, forest and natural resource management
  • Disaster response, environmental protection, and conservation
  • Employment creation

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