Global Governance Philadelphia
Good Governance

Global Governance: “A Philadelphia Moment”?

Author(s): Thomas G. Weiss
Date: May 7, 2014
Publication Type: Discussion Paper
Research Topics: Good Governance

Overview:

An obvious puzzle for friends and foes of international cooperation is how to explain why order, stability, and predictability exist despite the lack of a central authority to address the planet’s problems. In short, how is the world governed in the absence of a world government? This paper explores the concept of global governance and answers three questions: Why has the concept of global governance emerged? What is it? And finally, where is global governance going?

Key Findings:

Most countries, and especially the major powers, appear very distant indeed from accepting the need for elements of a global government and the necessary accompanying inroads on national autonomy. However, and as far-fetched as it may seem at the moment, global federalism may not seem unlikely a half-century or a century from now. In light of experience since the Treaty of Rome in 1957, it is illogical—unless the European Union is sui generis—to argue that supranational organizations are unthinkable.


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